Spring 2017 Courses

Hi Soc Students. We want to highlight some of our Spring 2017 courses! There are many interesting courses from law, to gender, racial inequality, transglobal, night classes, and unique topic courses. Be sure to explore the complete list of spring courses.
Full Spring 2017 Courses

Section for Night Classes

Soc 3211W – American Race Relations

  • This course will focus on race relations in today’s society with a historical overview of the experiences of various racial and ethnic groups in order to help explain their present-day social status.

Soc 3701 – Social Theory

  • Throughout this class, we have three goals: to learn to read and understand key theoretical work in sociology; to use this work to better understand the social world; and to develop our own capacity to talk and write about the world using ideas from theory.

Soc 3811 – Social Statistics

  • Introduction to to basic statistical measures and procedures that are used to describe and analyze quantitative data in sociological research

Soc 4106 – Crime on TV

  • This course uses television shows to explore sociological perspectives on crime and punishment. The premise of this class is that we can learn a great deal about lawbreaking and social control from watching (and analyzing) television shows. (It is also true that much television misrepresents the nature and consequences of crime and punishment.)

Soc 4521 – Love, Sex, and Marriage

  • Sociological approaches to intimate human relationships. Love, romance, dating, mate selection. Sexuality, cohabitation, marriage, related public policy debates. Current U.S. practices in historical/cross-cultural context.

Section for LCD Electives

Soc 4104 – Crime and Human Rights

  • Serious violations of humanitarian/human rights law. Criminalization. Impact of interventions on memories/future of cycles of violence. Case studies on Holocaust, Balkan wars, Darfur, My Lai massacre, etc. Criminal justice, truth commissions, vetting, compensation programs.

Soc 4106 – Crime on TV

  • This course uses television shows to explore sociological perspectives on crime and punishment. The premise of this class is that we can learn a great deal about lawbreaking and social control from watching (and analyzing) television shows. (It is also true that much television misrepresents the nature and consequences of crime and punishment.)

Soc 4125 – Policing America

  • Throughout the course, we focus on using a social science lens to understand what policing is and how it influences social life
  • Forms, dynamics, philosophical underpinnings of policing/surveillance agencies (formal/informal). Legal limitations, police culture, community relations, aims of policing, state power.

Soc 4135 – White Collar Crime

  • Part I. distinguishes different types of white-collar crime (e.g., embezzlement, fraud, conflict of interest, and corruption).
  • Part II. deals with the perception, legislation, and control of white-collar crime.

Section for Soc – General Electives

Soc 3311W – Hard times and Bad Behavior

  • As we read about hobos and sailors, opium users and saloon girls, and contemporary experiences on the streets, we trace themes about marginality in the US, such as rootlessness produced by labor market, the love-hate relationship between elites and marginal populations in popular culture, and the complex mixture of freedom and deprivation of people on the edge.

Soc 3322W – Social Movements, Protests, and Change

  • Origins, dynamics, and consequences of social movements. Challenges facing movement organizations. Relationship between movements and political institutions. Role of movements in bringing about social change. Theoretical issues, case studies

Soc 3411W – Organizations and Society

  • This course introduces undergraduates to contemporary theories and debates about formal organizations in an international context, including such forms as large corporations, small businesses, public bureaucracies, nonprofits, voluntary associations, social movement organizations, terrorist networks and counterterror organizations.

Soc 3421W – Sociology of Work

  • Work is central to individuals, economy, and society. This course introduces students to sociological perspectives and analyses of work. We will look at what makes a good job good, a bad job bad, and impacts of joblessness on society

Soc 3503 – Asian American Identities, Families, and Community

  • Overview of Asian American identities, families/communities. Racial/ethnic identity formation, immigration, intergenerational relationships, dating/family formation, transnational adoption, popular culture, educational/work experiences, ethnic enclaves/activism.

Soc 3681 – Gender and Family in the Islamic World

  • Experiences of Muslim women/families from historical/comparative perspective. Gender/family power relations in colonial representations, sexual politics, family, education/health, paid work, human rights, and Islamic feminism.

Soc 4305 – Environment and Society

  • Examines how natural/built environments influence human behavior/social organization. Focuses on microenvironments/their influence on individuals. Impact of macroenvironments on societal organization. Environmental movements.

Soc 4315 – Never Again! Memories and Politics After Genocide

  • Course focuses on the social repercussions and political consequences of large-scale political violence, such as genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity. Students learn how communities and states balance the demands for justice and memory with the need for peace and reconciliation and addresses cases from around the globe and different historical settings.

Section for Topics Unique for Spring Semester (3090 Topics courses)

Soc 3090 Section 1 – Immigration to the US: Beyond Walls

  • This course will identify & critically evaluate the many layers, nuances, & contradictions involved in immigration to the United States from a sociological perspective while also incorporating insights from other fields in & outside of the social sciences.

Soc 3090 Section 3 – On Drugs: Pleasures, Panics & Punishment

  • The course offers a deep immersion in the literature on comparative drug cultures and interventions from an interdisciplinary perspective (drawing primarily on sociology, psychology, and history) – giving them a strong grasp of this body of knowledge and requiring them to understand and compare the approaches of different disciplines and interdisciplinary theoretical traditions through application to this topic.

Soc 3090 Section A94 – Sociology of Neighborhoods – ONLINE – will meet the DATA ANALYSIS requirement for the BS major.

  • This course covers an introduction to the sociological literature on US neighborhoods. In this course students will be exposed to the current research on neighborhoods in the US and how this work has had effects on local policy (e.g., crime and education) and federal policy such as the Housing and Urban Development (HUD) program.

For a Complete list of courses click here:
Full Spring 2017 Courses